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View Full Version : Identifying ticks first step in preventing Lyme disease


Trellie
05-31-2016, 09:33 AM
I truly recommend this read, specially if you want to learn how to spot the tick that can actually infect you, specially if you are in Iowa.

Ticks are active from March through November, the same months that host the most outdoor activities. Understanding the different types of ticks that are found in the state and how to remove ticks if they become attached to a human or domestic animal is the focus of a new Iowa State University Extension and Outreach publication titled "Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases in Iowa."

For the rest of the article, simply search the title of this thread online.

John Snort
05-31-2016, 09:59 AM
Lyme disease is spread by black-legged ticks and as the ticks can bite dogs and infect them, you have to be careful around your dogs too because if the tick that bit them is still around or on the dog then it could bite you too, infecting you. But it is always advisable that any time you are bitten by a tick you should get see a doctor who knows about Lyme disease so they can prescribe some drugs. It's better to be safe than sorry.

Trellie
06-01-2016, 06:25 PM
It also depends on where you live, some areas are affected more heavily by infected ticks, if you live in one of those heavily hit zones then better be careful. I'm lucky to live in a zone where very few Lyme cases have been reported :)

oportosanto
06-02-2016, 05:33 AM
True, areas with more ticks will generate more cases, so if we live in those areas we need to be more careful.

lymegreen
06-02-2016, 07:27 PM
I'm not in Iowa, but I do still think the article is useful - if we learn more about ticks, we are learning more about Lyme Disease at the root cause of the problem - and that's a great thing, I think. Knowledge is power!

oportosanto
06-03-2016, 06:21 AM
All information is useful because it means we will be more capable of identifying the disease.

Trellie
06-03-2016, 08:21 PM
I'm not in Iowa, but I do still think the article is useful - if we learn more about ticks, we are learning more about Lyme Disease at the root cause of the problem - and that's a great thing, I think. Knowledge is power!

There is a thread about the states and cities that are most affected by those pesky infected ticks :( Check it out if you have the time to do so, I was so surprised to see that places like NY are severely affected!

Azrile
06-08-2016, 10:53 AM
While it is useful to be able to identify the tick that causes Lyme´s... it is just as easy to say ´make sure you remove any tick that is attached to your body´.. and who the heck cares what color it´s legs are, it can´t be a good thing to have a non-lyme´s tick attached to you. KISS keep it simple. If you have been in the woods, make sure you inspect yourself and your children and remove any ticks that are attached to you within 24 hours.

oportosanto
06-09-2016, 04:17 AM
Removing ticks is not that easy, especially if the legs aren't removed properly.

Azrile
06-09-2016, 07:15 PM
Removing ticks is not that easy, especially if the legs aren't removed properly.

The presents problems for skin infections, but it wouldn´t impact the transmission of Lyme Disease. If you get the body off and kill the tick, it isn´t going to transmit the bacteria. Again, it takes a long time of being attached until the bacteria can navigate into the humans bloodstream. You kill the tick, it is over.

oportosanto
06-14-2016, 04:00 AM
No only skin infections, a badly removed tick can cause tick fever,

Azrile
06-14-2016, 01:33 PM
No only skin infections, a badly removed tick can cause tick fever,

Ok, a virus also. But tick fever is mostly harmless, you get a fever and a headache for a few days and then it goes away without treatment needed.

That is compared to Lyme Disease which can basically be a lifetime condition with debilitating symptoms.

oportosanto
06-15-2016, 03:53 AM
Sure, you are right, tick fever is not as serious as Lyme, but it's not something good too.

Azrile
06-16-2016, 01:24 PM
Sure, you are right, tick fever is not as serious as Lyme, but it's not something good too.

It is like a bad cold or a minor case of the flu. Overall, riding on a city bus or an airplane is probably more dangerous ( as far as catching a cold or the flu).

oportosanto
06-17-2016, 03:03 AM
I don't know if it's that harmless, my mother-in-law had tick fever and it lasted for quite some time.