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View Full Version : Tick nymphs from the South US are less infectious than those from North US.


Sunny
05-08-2016, 11:34 AM
A study by Isis M. Arsnoe et al, examined populations of tick nymphs (Ixodes scapularis), then known carrier of Borrelia bacteria that cause Lyme disease.
What they found is that tick nymphs from the North States tend to be more likely to come in contact with humans who rummage through foliage because of their inherent tendency to quest for food at the stem and top leaves of the plants, as well as scatter on every solid area surrounding them.
Contrary to that, the tick nymphs from South States are less aggressive in moving around to find food and so they are less likely to find themselves in parts of plants or surfaces that a human might also come in contact with.

Their hypothesis confirms the fact there's a lower number of Lyme cases in the South compared to the North States.

Source: "Different Populations of Blacklegged Tick Nymphs Exhibit Differences in Questing Behavior That Have Implications for Human Lyme Disease Risk"
by Isis M. Arsnoe , Graham J. Hickling, Howard S. Ginsberg, Richard McElreath, Jean I. Tsao
Plos One Journal, published May 21 2015.
(It's Open Access)

Note: this post is not a diagnostic tool, it's here for educational purposes and discussion.

Trellie
05-09-2016, 05:35 PM
That's interesting, I wonder what makes the ones from the south be less aggressive when it comes to feeding off a human prey. That's really interesting! So I guess those folks living up in the north are more at risk. Something to be mindful of, no doubt about it.

lymegreen
05-10-2016, 08:06 PM
Definitely an interesting piece of research - I can only comment about the southern part of the US, as that's where my niece has lived all her life and she's been diagnosed with Lyme. Based on that I think ticks in the south are just as aggressive!

I'm glad to see more research being done though - understanding the disease is such an important part of working on better methods of treatment, and to me that's a wonderful thing.

Sunny
05-14-2016, 01:06 PM
- I can only comment about the southern part of the US, as that's where my niece has lived all her life and she's been diagnosed with Lyme. Based on that I think ticks in the south are just as aggressive!

Very interesting feedback, you got me thinking there, so I looked it up and I found another piece of research. I posted it on this thread:
http://www.lymeforums.org/forum/about-lyme-disease/31950-seasonality-lyme-disease-risk-effects-warming-climate.html

Azrile
05-15-2016, 10:50 AM
That's interesting, I wonder what makes the ones from the south be less aggressive when it comes to feeding off a human prey. That's really interesting! So I guess those folks living up in the north are more at risk. Something to be mindful of, no doubt about it.

It probably has to do with the warmer seasons allowing them longer time to mature through their life cycle. Up north, they only have 6 or so months to breed before winter comes so they probably have to be more active when it is warm.

Trellie
05-15-2016, 09:37 PM
It probably has to do with the warmer seasons allowing them longer time to mature through their life cycle. Up north, they only have 6 or so months to breed before winter comes so they probably have to be more active when it is warm.

Thanks for clearing my doubt, that is probably the reason! We are having a lot issues with ticks right now, and I live in the south :( It always starts when the weather gets warmer :(

lymegreen
05-23-2016, 06:11 PM
Very interesting feedback, you got me thinking there, so I looked it up and I found another piece of research. I posted it on this thread:
http://www.lymeforums.org/forum/about-lyme-disease/31950-seasonality-lyme-disease-risk-effects-warming-climate.html

Thanks for sharing this piece - it's a useful piece and got me thinking as well. I do wonder about things like global warming and the overall impact they are having on things like wildlife (and certainly in the case of Lyme, the prevalence of ticks).